Skip to main content

Costs of Paradata, Again

Still on this topic... We looked at the average time to complete a set of questions. These actions may be repeated many times (each time we have contact with a sampled household), but it still amounts to a trivial portion of total interviewer time (about .4%). They don't have to add much value to justify those costs.

On the other hand, there are still a couple of questions. 1) Could we reduce measurement error on these questions if we spent more time on them? Brady West has looked at ways to improve these observations. If a few seconds isn't enough time, would more time improve the measurements?

My hunch is that more time would improve the observations, but it would have other consequences. Which leads me to my second question: 2) Do these observations interfere with other parts of the survey process? For example, can they distract interviewers from the task of convincing sampled persons to do the interview?  My hunch on the latter question is that it is possible, but our current practice is unobtrusive. I'd also hazard a guess that interviewers see it as less important that getting the interview.

Again, it would probably require experiments to determine whether these "other consequences" might occur.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

"Responsive Design" and "Adaptive Design"

My dissertation was entitled "Adaptive Survey Design to Reduce Nonresponse Bias." I had been working for several years on "responsive designs" before that. As I was preparing my dissertation, I really saw "adaptive" design as a subset of responsive design.

Since then, I've seen both terms used in different places. As both terms are relatively new, there is likely to be confusion about the meanings. I thought I might offer my understanding of the terms, for what it's worth.

The term "responsive design" was developed by Groves and Heeringa (2006). They coined the term, so I think their definition is the one that should be used. They defined "responsive design" in the following way:

1. Preidentify a set of design features that affect cost and error tradeoffs.
2. Identify indicators for these costs and errors. Monitor these during data collection.
3. Alter the design features based on pre-identified decision rules based on the indi…

Goodhart's Law

I enjoy listening to the data skeptic podcast. It's a data science view of statistics, machine learning, etc. They recently discussed Goodhart's Law on the podcast. Goodhart's was an economist. The law that bears his name says that "when a measure becomes a target, then it ceases to be a good measure." People try and find a way to "game" the situation. They maximize the indicator but produce poor quality on other dimensions as a consequence. The classic example is a rat reduction program implemented by a government. They want to motivate the population to destroy rats, so they offer a fee for each rat that is killed. Rather than turn in the rat's body, they just ask for the tail. As a result, some persons decide to breed rats and cut off their tails. The end result... more rats.

I have some mixed feelings about this issue. There are many optimization procedures that require some single measure which can be either maximized or minimized. I think thes…

The Cost of a Call Attempt

We recently did an experiment with incentives on a face-to-face survey. As one aspect of the evaluation of the experiment, we looked at the costs associated with each treatment (i.e. different incentive amounts).

The costs are a bit complicated to parse out. The incentive amount is easy, but the interviewer time is hard. Interviewers record their time for at the day level, not at the housing unit level. So it's difficult to determine how much a call attempt costs.

Even if we had accurate data on the time spent making the call attempt, there would still be all the travel time from the interviewer's home to the area segment. If I could accurately calculate that, how would I spread it across the cost of call attempts? This might not matter if all I'm interested in is calculating the marginal cost of adding an attempt to a visit to an area segment. But if I want to evaluate a treatment -- like the incentive experiment -- I need to account for all the interviewer costs, as best…